Advertisement

Round Table Conferences


The three Round Table Conferences of 1930–32 were a series of conferences organized by the British Government to discuss constitutional reforms in India. They were conducted as per the recommendation by the report submitted by the Simon Commission in May 1930. Demands for self-rule, in India had been growing increasingly strong. By the 1930s, many British politicians believed that India needed to move towards dominion status. However, there were significant disagreements between the Indian and the British political parties that the Conferences would not resolve.

First Round Table Conference (November 1930 – January 1931)

The Round Table Conference was opened officially by Lord Irwin on November 12, 1930 at London and chaired by the British Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald.

The three British political parties were represented by sixteen delegates. There were fifty-seven political leaders from British India and sixteen delegates from the princely states. In total 89 delegates from India attended the Conference. However, the Indian National Congress, along with Indian business leaders, kept away from the conference. Many of them were in jail for their participation in Civil Disobedience Movement.

Second Round Table Conference (September – December 1931)

 The Second Round Table Conference (September 7, 1931)Congress Representation — The Gandhi-Irwin Pact opened the way for Congress participation in this conference. Mahatma Gandhi was invited from India and attended as the sole official Congress representative accompanied by Sarojini Naidu and also Madan Mohan Malaviya, Ghanshyam Das Birla, Muhammad Iqbal, Sir Mirza Ismail (Diwan of Mysore), S.K. Dutta and Sir Syed Ali Imam. Gandhi claimed that the Congress alone represented political India; that the Untouchables were Hindus and should not be treated as a “minority”; and that there should be no separate electorates or special safeguards for Muslims or other minorities. These claims were rejected by the other Indian participants. According to this pact, Gandhi was asked to call off the Civil Disobedience Movement (CDM) and if he did so the prisoners of the British government would be freed excepting the criminal prisoners, i.e. those who had killed British officials. He returned to India, disappointed with the results and empty-handed.

During the Conference, Gandhi could not reach agreement with the Muslims on Muslim representation and safeguards. At the end of the conference Ramsay MacDonald undertook to produce a Communal Award for minority representation, with the provision that any free agreement between the parties could be substituted for his award.

Gandhi took particular exception to the treatment of untouchables as a minority separate from the rest of the Hindu community. He clashed with the leader of depressed classes, Dr.B. R. Ambedkar, over this issue: the two eventually resolved the situation with the Poona Pact of 1932.

Third Round Table Conference (November – December 1932)

The third and last session assembled on November 17, 1932. Only forty-six delegates attended since most of the main political figures of India were not present. The Labour Party from Britain and the Indian National Congress refused to attend.

From September 1931 until March 1933, under the supervision of the Secretary of State for India, Sir Samuel Hoare, the proposed reforms took the form reflected in the Government of India Act 1935.

More Nurse Latest Articles

Neurotransmitters and Functions of Different Hormones

NEUROTRANSMITTER Synapses Acetylcholine dopamine epinephrine nor epinephrine Serotonin histamine Aspartate glutamate glycine GABA Nurse Nursing Nursing Psychiatery

NEUROTRANSMITTER is a Chemical substances that mediate signaling from neuron     to another neuron or a muscle or gland cells through     chemical synapses

SYNAPSES

Junctions where neurons pass signals to a postsynaptic...
>>>Continue Reading...

Motivation,Types of Motives,Types Of Motivation Theories

Types Of Motivation Theories Motivation Motives theories of motivation Content Theories Process Theories Reinforcement Theory

What is motivation ?

The driving & pulling forces which result in persistent behavior directed towards particular goals, is called

“ Motivation”.

It refers to the physiological & psychological factors that cause u...
>>>Continue Reading...

INTELLIGENCE And Types of INTELLIGENCE Tests

INTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE TESTS  BINET-SIMON SCALE Alfred Binet Louis Terman PERFORMANCE TEST  CULTURE-FAIR TEST Psychological Test Nursing Psychology

INTELLIGENCE Human intelligence is a mental quality that consists of the abilities to learn from experience, adapt to new situations and use knowledge to manipulate one’s environment. (written by : psychologist Robert Sternberg)

TYPES...
>>>Continue Reading...

LEARNING THEORIES

Learning LEARNING THEORIES What is Learning Fleming's VARK Model VARK Model Memory Psychology Developmental Psychology Brain Thinking Nursing Psychology

DEFINITION: Learning is…

A change in behavior as a result of experience or practice.

The acquisition of knowledge.

Knowledge gained through study.

To gain knowledge of, or skill in, something through study...
>>>Continue Reading...

Memory and Loss of Memory

Retrieval Storage Encoding Anterograde amnesia Retrograde amnesia Infantile child amnesia Psychology Developmental Psychology

Memory

Stages of memory

Encoding:

 Converting information into a useable form

Storage:

 Holding this information in memory

Retrieval:

 Taking memories out of storage

<...
>>>Continue Reading...

Emotions Psychology

Emotions Emotions Psycho Emotions psychology Arousal Developmental Psychology Nurse Nursing Emotion Emotion and Nursing

A strong feeling deriving from one's circumstances, mood, or relationships with others.

Emotion
Three Components of Emotion

Arousal and Emotion
Arousal is the physiological and psychological state of being  awoke...
>>>Continue Reading...

ADOLESCENCE Developmental Psychology

ADOLESCENCE ADOLESCENCE Development Developmental Psychology Psychology Thinking Brain Jean Piaget and Adolescence

The transitional period of physical and psychological development between childhood and maturity.It is the period of development that begins at puberty and ends at emerging adulthood. the typical age range is from 12- 18 years .

Developm...
>>>Continue Reading...

School Child (5-12 years) Developmental Psychology

School Child School Child thinking School Child psychology School Child Development Developmental Psychology Psychology

The years between 5 and 12—middle childhood and early adolescence are a time of important developmental advances that establish children’s sense of identity. This period is often referred to as the "school years".

During these years ...
>>>Continue Reading...

Pre-School Child (2-5 years) Developmental Psychology

Preschool psychology Development Developmental Psychology Brain Thinking Jean Piaget Sigmund Freud

Cognition is "the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience, and the senses."It encompass processes such as knowledge, attention, memory judgment , evaluation, reasoning , computation, pr...
>>>Continue Reading...

Infancy Age 0 to 2 years Developmental Psychology

DEVELOPMENT GROWTH Infancy Development Neonate Psychology

NEONATE(Birth----28days)

A newborn or neonate, is a child under 28 days of age

INFANCY(1month---2years)

The state or period of early childhood or babyhood

GROWTH

The process of increasing in physic...
>>>Continue Reading...

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Stages of Development

STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENTAL Infancy Pre school Child School Child Adolescence Adulthood Old age Psychology

PSYCHOLOGY Psychology is The scientific study of mind and its function.

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Is the scientific study of how and why human beings change over the course of their life. Originally concerned with infants and children, t...
>>>Continue Reading...

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Psychology Psychoanalytic Humanism Biological/Biomedical Constructivism Cognitivism

Psychology:The scientific study of mind and its functions.

Developmental psychology: 

Developmental psychology is the branch of psychology that studies physical, cognitive, and social change of humans throughout their life cyc...
>>>Continue Reading...

Referencing APA and Vancouver Style For Research

APA Vancouver Style Referencing References Reference for research Research References Nursing English

Recent research (1) indicates that the number of duplicate papers being published is increasing. Or Recent research1 indicates that the number of duplicate papers being published is increasing.

Citing more than one piece of work at the ...
>>>Continue Reading...

Feedback mechanisms

Feedback mechanisms Receptor Control center Effector Anatomy Nurse Nurses Anatomy Nursing Anatomy

Feedback mechanisms Our body regulates the internal system through a multitude of feedback systems. There are three basic parts to the feedback  system; a receptor, a control centre and an effector. The effector can be a muscle, organs or other ...
>>>Continue Reading...

Homeostasis

Homeostasis Body PH Nursing Anatomy Nursing Physiology

Homeostasis is the ability of the body or a cell to seek and maintain a condition of equilibrium within its internal environment when dealing with external changes. It is a state of equilibrium for the body. Homeostasis allows the organs of the bo...
>>>Continue Reading...